Finnish language, dialects, benefits of a good grapheme/phone(me) fit 

A great benefit of the finnish language's close phonetic correlation is that every Finnish dialect has a written language that is immediately recognizable as dialectal.

This allows people to write in their mother tongue, rather than in some national average, or worse yet, some old-fashioned high-class garbage.

Finnish language, dialects, benefits of a good grapheme/phone(me) fit 

@ansugeisler Although writing ANY Finnish dialect is a pain in the ass, especially when there are assimilations over word boundaries (liasions and elisions) that are generally not recognized in any Finnish writing, either standardised or dialectal.

So if you're going to write Finnish dialects, get ready for huge ortographical compromises all down the way.

Finnish language, dialects, benefits of a good grapheme/phone(me) fit 

@Stoori Compared to writing a dialect in phonetic script it's still much better.

In most countries, people will just write in the written language, which strongly disadvantages their own speech, even in their own mind.

Follow

Finnish language, dialects, benefits of a good grapheme/phone(me) fit 

@ansugeisler I don't know if any comparisons are done or not, but I haven't seen any noticeable difference in the amount of dialectal writing between Finnish and some other European languages.

In Twitter-like systems almost everyone, regardless of language, writes very colloquially, whereas in long-post systems almost everyone writes more formally, regardless of language.

It seems to depend more on the platform than language.

Finnish language, dialects, benefits of a good grapheme/phone(me) fit 

@Stoori Denmark has pretty significant dialectal variations, but it's very rare to find written forms.
I certainly haven't seen the kind of prolific production as I see in Finland.

But, haven't made any official studies, so "hunch" territory.

Finnish language, dialects, benefits of a good grapheme/phone(me) fit 

@ansugeisler My observation (after studying multiple languages) is, that if you really want to test how well you can understand colloquial language, go search some tweets in that language. Good luck deciphering what people are talking about!

(Of course you can't do this with your native language, that won't pose problems.)

It would be nice to suggest toots for this purpose, but colloquialisms here are much rarer actually!

Finnish language, dialects, benefits of a good grapheme/phone(me) fit 

@Stoori Colloqiual language and dialect are potentially different things.

The only real difference between the "official" language and its dialects is that the official variant has more institutions supporting it (even barring situations like France's Academie).

They're all "traditional", just with less clout and less nitpickers on the side of the dialect.

Colloquial language is potential, the synchronic form of the others.

Finnish language, dialects, benefits of a good grapheme/phone(me) fit 

@ansugeisler But in regards to ortography (especially viewed from a non-native perspective) they're in the same position: the ortography is not designed to support them. That's why writing colloquial and writing dialect are comparable.

And since you started the thread with Finnish, well, standard Finnish is a constructed lingua franca, different from *every* Finnish dialect and colloquial. It's the only form without tradition.

Finnish language, dialects, benefits of a good grapheme/phone(me) fit 

@Stoori Oh, absolutely.

But working from a fairly close phonetic base makes it many magnitudes easier.

Compare to English, where the orthography is tuned to a hodge-podge of long-dead upper-class dialects with only faint phonetic association between written and spoken form.

Finnish language, dialects, benefits of a good grapheme/phone(me) fit 

@ansugeisler Yeah, there are different degrees of difficulty, certainly.

Thinking through this gives interesting thoughts, though. Almost every European language is blind to their own polysynthetic features, because European ortographies don't reflect polysynthesis very well. This is most apparent in French, but even Finnish has problems with this. These omissions make writing non-standard variants harder.

Sign in to participate in the conversation
Polyglot City

Polyglot City is the right instance for you, if you're interested in languages, language learning and translating, or if you are multilingual or polyglot. All languages are allowed to flourish on our timelines. Welcome!