translation software 

First time trying out OmegaT in actual translation work, and it's so incredibly fast!

Translation software in general is bloat after bloat after bloat, every update making the software slower. But this, this just does the job and doesn't waste time thinking what it should do next.

This is nearly unbelievable! Modern software has accustomed us to slow operation, so when a rare piece of software actually *works* it feels suspicious — can it really do what it claims to do?

translation software 

@Stoori That looks like great software. I had had the impression that software of this type was always proprietary.

So we had considered such a FOSS tool as one of the projects for Translate Science.

We did think of a tool that would life in the internet, so that multiple people can jointly work on a translation. Especially for scientific articles it is helpful to have people with language skills and technical skill work on a text together and together it may be more fun.

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translation software 

@TranslateScience for collaboration some online service is of course much more versatile

i'd suggest you take a look at Weblate, many libre software projects use it. so perhaps it's geared more for localization and thus is not the perfect tool for translating scientific prose, but it's a good starting point and one that i know about

translation software 

@Stoori We know Weblate. Although I have not really tried it.

But I guess Weblate presuposes that the text to be translated is in a well defined text format. While most scientific articles have equations, tables, figures.

Real scientific articles are hardly ever well-formatted text files. Mostly it will be a PDF, if we are really happy it is some word file that does not use styles for markup. XML files or well-defined Word files hardly exist. Sometimes one may have LaTex.

translation software 

@TranslateScience Okay, it may be that Weblate is not so suitable then.

There are some options for collaborative projects in OmegaT, but I guess those should be well-defined in the sense that it's a bit more rigorous on how new people can join them and how and not as smooth as running a web-based translation project. But I haven't tried them, I'm just speculating. Have a look and see what you think.

translation software 

@Stoori Yes, we should simply try and translate a few articles with both systems. Even if we code something (or an internet wrapper) ourselves, there are a lot of good ideas to steal.

translation software 

@TranslateScience @Stoori I work regularly in weblate, and there are parts I don't really love. The installation I'm using, at least, has no reasonable way of handling TM searches and "fuzzy matches".
Another lovely open-source online tool is transifex, I've worked some in that as well. For me, it's generally much easier to work in, but I'm not sure how well it handles different file types. It's also very much geared towards soiftware localization.

translation software 

@TranslateScience @Stoori
However, I do know that OmegaT can handle online TM's and team projects. OmegaT is generally very extensible and customizable. You could probably achieve what you need in OmegaT, but it might be demanding of the translators, when it comes to technical skill.

translation software 

@panina Thank you for the helpful information. Looking into Transifex I found that Wikipedia claims it is no longer open source and if it is (again) the homepage does not advertise it. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transife

@Stoori

translation software 

@TranslateScience @Stoori oh shoot, I missed that. It might have been a misunderstanding of mine as well...

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